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HKFP Lens: City of protest, part 1 – May James’s shots of Hong Kong’s month of dissent

Photo Hong Kong Free Press

Hong Kong has been rocked by weeks of protest sparked by a controversial bill that would enable the transfer of fugitives to jurisdictions where there are no prior extradition agreements, such as China.The bill was suspended on June 15, but not axed.
'Hong Kong has been rocked by weeks of protest  sparked by a controversial bill that would enable the transfer of fugitives to jurisdictions where there are no prior extradition agreements, such as China.The bill was suspended on June 15, but not axed.The protests have since morphed into a wider display of discontent against dwindling freedoms, calls for democracy, and alleged police misconduct related to the use of crowd control measures.Photographer May James shares shots of recent events with HKFP.Photo: May James.Clashes break out On June 12, police deployed tear gas and rubber bullets against anti-extradition law protesters during a clearance operation of the roads around the Legislative Council Complex, prompting accusations of misconduct related to the use of force.Several demonstrators and police officers were injured in the clashes.Photo: May James.Photo: May James.Photo: May James.Photo: May James.Photo: May James.Photo: May James.Photo: May James.Photo: May James.Photo: May James.Photo: May James.Photo: May James.Photo: May James.Photo: May James.Photo: May James. ‘Two million’ strong march A mass rally saw what organisers estimated to be around two million people march against the extradition bill among other grievances on June 16.The figure represents 28.5 per cent of the city’s population, though police said 338,000 joined along the designated walking route at the peak of the demonstration.Photo: May James.Photo: May James.Photo: May James.Photo: May James.Photo: May James.Photo: May James.Photo: May James.Photo: May James.Photo: May James.Photo: May James.Photo: May James.Photo: May James.Photo: May James.Photo: May James.Photo: May James.Photo: May James.Photo: May James.Siege on police HQ Masked protesters clad in black laid siege to police headquarters in Wan Chai on June 21, pelting eggs and hurling insults at nearby officers.Many of them called for the withdrawal of the extradition bill, accountability for alleged police misconduct, for Chief Executive Carrie Lam to resign, and for the term “riot” to be retracted as a characterisation of the June 12 protest.Photo: May James.Photo: May James.Photo: May James.Photo: May James.Photo: May James.Photo: May James.Photo: May James.Photo: May James.Photo: May James.Photo: May James.Photo: May James.The Hong Kong Free Press #PressForFreedom 2019 Funding Drive seeks to raise HK$1.2m to support our non-profit newsroom and dedicated team of multi-media, multi-lingual reporters.HKFP is backed by readers, run by journalists and is immune to political and commercial pressure.This year’s critical fundraiser will provide us with the essential funds to continue our work into next year. . The post HKFP Lens: City of protest, part 1 – May James’s shots of Hong Kong’s month of dissent appeared first on Hong Kong Free Press HKFP . Author: HKFP Lens .'

HKFP Lens: Thien-Ty Ly returns with a panoramic take on everyday Hong Kong

Photo Hong Kong Free Press

Thien-Ty Ly is a French photographer of Chinese descent.Ly has shared with HKFP his Hong Kong photography series Hongkongers Daily.The series is being exhibited at Chez Trente from 24 may to 23 June as part of Hong Kong Contemporary Photography, A
'Thien-Ty Ly is a French photographer of Chinese descent.Ly has shared with HKFP his Hong Kong photography series Hongkongers Daily . Photo: Thien-Ty Ly.The series is being exhibited at Chez Trente from 24 may to 23 June as part of Hong Kong Contemporary Photography, A Solo Panoramic Film Photography Exhibition . Photo: Thien-Ty Ly.Ly said that Hong Kong provides a wealth of subjects to photograph: “I have been documenting Hong Kong city life through street photography for six years.I am passionate about capturing spontaneity.I like to place the human subject at the heart of my photograph and explore the relationship that person has to their everyday environment,” he said.Photo: Thien-Ty Ly.Ly added he enjoys shooting with 35mm film cameras.For this exhibition, he used a 35mm black and white Hasselblad Xpan 24mm x 65mm panoramic format to capture the full scope of his street photographs.Photo: Thien-Ty Ly.Ly moved to Hong Kong after a four-year stint in China.Photo: Thien-Ty Ly.View Ly’s China  Live in Alley  series here . Photo: Thien-Ty Ly.Photo: Thien-Ty Ly.Photo: Thien-Ty Ly.Photo: Thien-Ty Ly.See Ly’s website for more.   . The post HKFP Lens: Thien-Ty Ly returns with a panoramic take on everyday Hong Kong appeared first on Hong Kong Free Press HKFP . Author: HKFP Lens .'

HKFP Lens: Lisa Ross dives into the heart of Uighur identity with shots from China’s Xinjiang

Photo Hong Kong Free Press

Lisa Ross is a New York-based photographer, video artist and educator.Her latest body of work I Can’t Sleep: Homage to a Uyghur Homeland, features a series of group portraits of women and children on their beds, outdoors, during the day.
'Lisa   Ross  is a New York-based photographer, video artist and educator.Her latest body of work  I Can’t Sleep: Homage to a Uyghur Homeland , features a series of group portraits of women and children on their beds, outdoors, during the day.Taken in Turpan, in Xinjiang, the project began in 2002 with a series of photo collections focused on Uighur homelands and sacred sites, to be completed in 2011. ‘I Can’t Sleep: Homage to a Uyghur Homeland’ by Lisa Ross.Photo: Lisa Ross.Her first Xinjiang photo series  Living Shrines in Uyghur China  did not feature any people. “The absence of the human figures was essential in permitting the viewer to enter the photograph and connect to the ritual objects and landscapes,” she told HKFP, adding she was not sure whether it was safe to show Uighurs in western media. ‘I Can’t Sleep: Homage to a Uyghur Homeland’ by Lisa Ross.Photo: Lisa Ross.But in  I Can’t Sleep: Homage to a Uyghur Homeland,  the human figure is prominent in each photograph.The beds are positioned in open, dry fields, and remain exactly where they were slept on by their owners,  Ross  said, adding that it is a tradition in Turpan for people to sleep outdoors during hot summer months. “Farmers whose job it is to oversee the drying of raisins work on arid, barren hills and often sleep where they are working even though their homes may not be near,” she said. “This explains why the beds in these photographs often have an otherworldly and dreamlike feel to them and why I was initially attracted to them.” ‘I Can’t Sleep: Homage to a Uyghur Homeland’ by Lisa Ross.Photo: Lisa Ross.Ross  said the work intends to provoke the questions: who are Uighurs, and what are their traditions? ‘I Can’t Sleep: Homage to a Uyghur Homeland’ by Lisa Ross.Photo: Lisa Ross. “These basic questions are urgent right now as Uighur history and culture are being destroyed,” she said. “Mosques and holy sites are being razed by the government.Over 500-year-old structures are disappearing like the 1.5 million Uighurs who have been placed in concentration camps, while academics and artists are being arrested for the work they were once rewarded for.” ‘I Can’t Sleep: Homage to a Uyghur Homeland’ by Lisa Ross.Photo: Lisa Ross. “My dear friend, Rahile Dawut, PhD., ran the Folklore Department at Xinjiang University.She has been missing for over a year and a half now and, to the best of our knowledge, she was never given a trial,”  Ross  added. ‘I Can’t Sleep: Homage to a Uyghur Homeland’ by Lisa Ross.Photo: Lisa Ross.Xinjiang is populated predominantly by Muslim Uighurs and other ethnic minorities, targetted in what Beijing claims to be a campaign to tackle un rest and separatism.The UN says a million Uighurs have been arbitrarily detained in extralegal “ political reeducation camps ,” while Human Rights Watch reports that surveillance and repression in Xinjiang has increased dramatically since 2016. ‘I Can’t Sleep: Homage to a Uyghur Homeland’ by Lisa Ross.Photo: Lisa Ross.Ross  has worked in North Africa, Central Asia, China, Europe and Azerbaijan.She received an MFA in Visual Arts from Columbia University and a BA from Sarah Lawrence College.Her work has been exhibited in the US and Europe.In 2018 she was an artist in residence at View Art Gallery in Lanzhou, China.Kong Tsung-gan ‘s new collection of essays – narrative, journalistic, documentary, analytical, polemical, and philosophical – trace the fast-paced, often bewildering developments in Hong Kong since the 2014 Umbrella Movement.As Long As There Is Resistance, There Is Hope is available exclusively through HKFP with a min.HK$200 donation . Thanks to the kindness of the author, 100 per cent of your payment will go to HKFP’s critical 2019 #PressForFreedom Funding Drive. . The post HKFP Lens: Lisa Ross dives into the heart of Uighur identity with shots from China’s Xinjiang appeared first on Hong Kong Free Press HKFP . Author: HKFP Lens .'

HKFP Lens: Hong Kong’s mind-boggling density showcased in the late Michael Wolf’s classic photo series

Photo Hong Kong Free Press

Best known locally for his photography series “Architecture of Density,” Michael Wolf passed away this week on Cheung Chau aged 65.The photos depicted residential blocks as dense patterns with a sense of claustrophobia.HKFP shares the classic series
'Best known locally for his photography series “Architecture of Density,” Michael Wolf passed away this week on Cheung Chau aged 65.The photos depicted residential blocks as dense patterns with a sense of claustrophobia.HKFP shares the classic series by the award-winning German photographer, courtesy of Blue Lotus Gallery.Michael Wolf’s Architecture of Density.Courtesy: Blue Lotus Gallery.Born in Munich in 1954, Wolf was raised in the United States, Canada, and Europe.He attended college at the University of California, Berkeley and later received a degree in visual communication from the University of Essen.He moved to Hong Kong in 1994 while working as a photojournalist for  Stern  magazine, and started working under his own name from 2002 onwards.Michael Wolf’s Architecture of Density.Courtesy: Blue Lotus Gallery. “In Architecture of Density, I investigate these enormous city blocks, finding a mesmerising abstraction in the buildings’ facades,” he said.Michael Wolf’s Architecture of Density.Courtesy: Blue Lotus Gallery.The structures in the series are photographed without reference to the context of sky or ground, and many buildings are seen in a state of repair or construction: their walls covered with a grid of scaffolding or the soft colored curtains that protect the streets below from falling debris.From a distance, such elements become a part of an intricate design.Upon closer inspection of each photograph, the anonymous public face of the city is full of rewarding detail –  public space is private space,  large swatches of colour give way to smaller pieces of people’s lives.The trappings of the people are still visible here: their days inform the detail of these buildings.Bits of laundry and hanging plants pepper the tiny rectangles of windows- the only irregularities in this orderly design.The images of Architecture of Density give one an inkling of what our cities could look like if grown continues unchecked.Michael Wolf’s Architecture of Density.Courtesy: Blue Lotus Gallery.His friends in Hong Kong paid tribute to him and his work following his passing: “What I learnt from Michael was that it takes an extraordinary eye to see the ordinary, no matter how small or strange that is,” local artist Kacey Wong told HKFP.Michael Wolf’s Architecture of Density.Courtesy: Blue Lotus Gallery.Sarah Greene, of the Blue Lotus Gallery told HKFP: “Hong Kong was his favourite city which kept inspiring him, zooming out on the beehive with his iconic work ‘architecture of density’ and zooming into the veins of the city exploring the vernacular beauty of the back alleys.” Michael Wolf’s Architecture of Density.Courtesy: Blue Lotus Gallery.Michael Wolf’s Architecture of Density.Courtesy: Blue Lotus Gallery.Michael Wolf’s Architecture of Density.Courtesy: Blue Lotus Gallery.Michael Wolf’s Architecture of Density.Courtesy: Blue Lotus Gallery.Michael Wolf’s Architecture of Density.Courtesy: Blue Lotus Gallery.Michael Wolf’s Architecture of Density.Courtesy: Blue Lotus Gallery.Michael Wolf’s Architecture of Density.Courtesy: Blue Lotus Gallery.Michael Wolf’s Architecture of Density.Courtesy: Blue Lotus Gallery.Michael Wolf’s Architecture of Density.Courtesy: Blue Lotus Gallery.Michael Wolf’s Architecture of Density.Courtesy: Blue Lotus Gallery.Michael Wolf’s Architecture of Density.Courtesy: Blue Lotus Gallery.Michael Wolf’s Architecture of Density.Courtesy: Blue Lotus Gallery.Michael Wolf’s Architecture of Density.Courtesy: Blue Lotus Gallery.Michael Wolf’s Architecture of Density.Courtesy: Blue Lotus Gallery. . The post HKFP Lens: Hong Kong’s mind-boggling density showcased in the late Michael Wolf’s classic photo series appeared first on Hong Kong Free Press HKFP . Author: Tom Grundy .'

HKFP Lens: Photographer Jess Yu keeps it real with candid shots of Hong Kong city life

Photo Hong Kong Free Press

Hong Kong-native Jess Yu has been taking photographs professionally since 2007, having trained in the art during an exchange programme at a university in Shanghai, China.She also graduated from a university in Hong Kong, majoring in Cultural
'Hong Kong-native Jess Yu has been taking photographs professionally since 2007, having trained in the art during an exchange programme at a university in Shanghai, China.She also graduated from a university in Hong Kong, majoring in Cultural Studies, and finished her Master’s Degree in Communication in 2017.Photo: Jess Yu.Yu told HKFP that she is a “post-80s photographer… driven by human connection and curiosity.”Photo: Jess Yu.She has also described herself as “one of the few local, devoted female photographers in town.”Photo: Jess Yu.Yu has trained as a journalist and has won awards for photography competitions, which she said encouraged her to take up the art seriously.Photo: Jess Yu.The photographer added that she enjoys exploring different fields of photography, and has a particular penchant for shooting street scenes and “surreal” aerial shots that reflect the many sides of Hong Kong.Photo: Jess Yu.Photo: Jess Yu.Photo: Jess Yu.Photo: Jess Yu.Photo: Jess Yu.Photo: Jess Yu.Photo: Jess Yu.Photo: Jess Yu.Follow Yu on Facebook and Instagram for more.The post HKFP Lens: Photographer Jess Yu keeps it real with candid shots of Hong Kong city life appeared first on Hong Kong Free Press HKFP.Author: HKFP Lens.'